“Hey, have you ever heard the myth where everyone is looking at their screen?” Sid eyes widen when he saw me.

“Not interested.” I brushed him off.

“Aw… man. I bet you had read it before and that’s why you’re not interested.” He blocked my path.

“Shut up.” I put my fingers on his lips, joking.


Indeed I read one of those stories in the library. Weaklings. Had to build a cubic to stay. They don’t have any concern about natural landscapes. Grey building littered everywhere. Yuck.

Everyone stay at a place that they called home but still need to go out when they’re bored. I love a mossy sleeping place in Arizona but I don’t think I would love to stay there for a whole life period. Himalayan wasn’t that bad. Right, they had to layer themselves when it’s snowing. Like an onion. Run looking for shelter if it’s raining. What’s wrong with rain. It cleanses my skin. Calm and relaxed. The breeze brings the chill through my spine.

Oh, the most disgusting part is when I read the description of the sky. It’s brown based on the myth. Holy Molly. I get it if an aurora is beautiful but brown? I don’t understand why they love the ground colour so much. Also, if they really like the ground colour, why do their clothes brighter than the land and the sky. What kind of life is that? The writers must have a huge imagination there.

My dad told me a myth maybe real because a myth is a part of history that does not fit in the history itself. I still couldn’t believe it, even just the possibility of existing.

Last week, my dad and his explorer team also found a relic. A tube made of invisible material. It’s not decayed yet so the original form still remains the same. Do they want to trap the air inside there, I asked my dad. It might be used for liquid he said. I wonder why do we need that, we can drink directly from lakes or rivers and they’re everywhere. Dad couldn’t explain it too. Maybe if you want to traverse Sahara desert in snail pace, we might need one he assumed.


“Gus, have you ever cross North Atlantic?” Sid asked me again after the class session.

“Yes, it took us two days to swim.” North America to Ireland. Mom and dad had a fight along the way.

“How was it?”

“It was boring. I wouldn’t suggest it for sightseeing. Although it’s good for family time or bonding. You should try Northwestern Passage.” Luckily, they don’t have any other option than to reconcile.

“Why?”

“Well, there’s more to see and sometimes it feels like a labyrinth. Another reason… what am I doing I wouldn’t spoil it for you. You should try it for yourself.” You should feel the cold and the scenery there on your own, Sid. Winding route, grey whales, white tranquil ice sheet, and the thrill itself are all worth it.

“Gee… If you say so then it must be so beautiful, huh?”

“One of the best open sea course in the world.” I would love to return there again.

“It must be that amazing if our Gus say it so.” Did he just praised me?

“You’re one of the best sea-man that I’ve ever met.” Yes, he does.

Credit: Photo by Daniel Roe on Unsplash